FHA Streamlined Refinance: Credit vs Non-Credit Qualifying

With an FHA streamlined refi, most folks have the misconception due to the program name “streamlined” that the refinances are close very quickly and are a slam dunk with little to no paperwork. While they do close quicker than a typical refinance since more often than not, you’re not waiting on an appraisal, if you’re going for a lower cost or better rate, you’re probably opting for a “credit qualifying” FHA streamlined refi. What’s the difference?

FHA streamlined credit qualifying basically means that the borrower is providing income and asset documents, just like a regular refinance. By providing documentation that shows they actually qualify for the new mortgage, lenders provide preferred pricing. Since it is a “manual” underwrite (a real human is underwriting the loan and not a computer program) the debt to income ratio is limited to 45%.

FHA streamlined non-credit qualifying is when income documentation is not provided and not stated on the loan application. The borrower’s income is not a consideration. Because of the higher risk, the rate or pricing is often slightly higher.

EDITORS NOTE: Rates quoted below are expired (years old!!)for a current mortgage rate quote for your home in Washington state, click here.

Right now (July 25, 2012 at 11:00 am) I’m working on a quote for an FHA streamlined refinance for a home located in Seattle. The rates quoted below are based on mid credit scores of 680 –  720 with no appraisal and the base loan amount is $289,000.

FHA credit qualifying 30 year fixed: 3.375% (apr 4.548) priced with just over 1 point in rebate credit which will cover closing cost and some of the prepaids/reserves. Principal and interest payment is $1300.01.

FHA non-credit qualifying 30 year fixed: 3.750% (apr 4.934) priced just under 1 point (about 0.25% difference in fee) which covers closing cost and some of the prepaids/reserves. Principal and interest payment is $1361.82.

NOTE: for a current rate quote on a home located anywhere in Washington state, based on today’s pricing and your scenario, click here.

What type of supporting documentation is required?  This is in additional to a complete loan application and credit report.

Non-credit qualifying:

  • Copy of your existing mortgage Note
  • Copy of your mortgage statement (we need to document a “Net Tangible Benefit”)
  • Bank statement (all pages) if funds are due at closing. Large deposits may be required to be documented.
  • Drivers license
  • Social security card
  • Payoff obtained from escrow company documenting that the current month’s mortgage payment has been made

Credit qualifying: all the above, plus…

  • last two years W2s
  • last two years tax returns (if self employed)
  • most recent paystubs documenting 30 days of income
  • most recent bank statements (all pages) documenting at least funds for closing. Large deposits may be required to be documented.

Additional documentation may be required depending on your personal scenario.

Whether you opt for non-credit qualifying or credit qualifying is your choice and depends on your financial scenario. When rates and pricing are the same for both scenarios, most would opt for “non-credit” qualifying. Since recent changes with how HUD prices FHA mortgage insurance for some loans, there has been major changes with which banks are offering FHA streamlines and how they’re pricing them.

If I can help you refinance your FHA loan on your home located anywhere in Washington state, please contact me.

What Do You Need for a Preapproval?

preapprovalIf you’re considering buying a home, many real estate agents and/or sellers will require a preapproval letter. A preapproval letter is different than being “prequalified”. Being prequalifed means that you have provided verbal information to a mortgage originator to get an idea of what you qualify for. Being preapproved means that you are providing documentation that supports the information you have provided. Income, employment, assets and credit are verified for a preapproval.

Some preapproval letters aren’t worth the paper they’re written on. Especially if the mortgage originator you’re working with does not require supporting documentation before preparing the letter. If you have not provided supporting documentation (listed below) to your mortgage originator – you’re probably just prequalified and not actually preapproved.

Here is a list of documents you may be required to provide in order to obtain a preapproval:

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5 Ways to Derail Your Loan Approval

MonorailYou’re getting ready to buy a home or refinance your home with your closing day around the corner when your mortgage originator contacts you to let you know there may be a problem.  Some issues may not revealed until days or sometimes weeks into a transaction.  Anytime documentation is provided to the mortgage company, it has the potential to raise more questions or require more documentation to satisfy underwriting guidelines.   Here are five situations to be aware of that can cause headaches during the loan process.

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What Determines How Much Home You Qualify to Buy: Part 1 – Your Payment

seesawPreapproval letters typically begin stating that a home buyer has been qualified or preapproved to buy a home priced at specific amount.  What it really boils down to is how much mortgage payment the home buyer qualifies for based on the borrowers monthly income and the debt to income ratio that is being allowed by the program guidelines.   Your proposed mortgage payment determines the loan amount that you’re qualified for.   Add the funds to cover your down payment less the closing cost and you’ll have the sales price.

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Paying Alimony? You May Want to Consider an FHA Insured Mortgage

UPDATE: You no longer have to FHA if you’re paying alimony... Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have updated their guidelines. Check it out here!

Most mortgage originators know that if you have less than 10 payments remaining with alimony or child support payments, it may not have to be factored into your qualifying ratios (debt to income) as long as the payment doesn’t impact your ability to pay the mortgage following closing.  A borrower needs to be well qualified with plenty of savings for an underwriter to support this guideline. [Read more…]

How Much Home Can I Afford?

This is a common question from first time home buyers.  When working with home buyers who are just beginning the process, after discussing credit and other information, I like to ask in return:

  • What type of monthly mortgage payment would you be comfortable making?
  • How much money are you planning on using for a down payment and closing costs.

To me, it’s better to solve for your potential sales price rather than finding a home or getting your heart set on a certain sales price first before knowing what you actually qualify for.

For example, Seattle Sally has saved up $75,000 and would like to use $40,000 towards a home purchase.  She has been paying anywhere from $2,200 – $2,000 a month for rent and would like to keep her payment around $2000. 

NOTE: Rates quoted below are from October 2009 and are outdated. If you would like a current mortgage rate quote for your home located in Washington, please contact me.

Beginning with a conventional scenario, a payment of $2038 (principal, interest, estimated property taxes, estimated home owners insurance and private mortgage insurance) with about $40,000 for down payment and closing costs would produce a sales price of $325,000.  This is based on a 30 year fixed rate of 4.625%* (apr 4.790).

A sales price of $365,000 with a 10% down payment and the sellers contributing towards closing costs would produce a payment of about $2283.

The only issue I would have with the conventional financing is that private mortgage insurance is that these days, pmi underwriters are picking all mortgages to pieces.

FHA would provide a total payment of $2076 with about $40,000 for down payment and closing costs and a sales price of $325,000.  This is based on a rate of 4.875% (apr 5.400).

If we have the seller pay most of the closing costs and prepaids, a payment of $2287 would produce a sales price of $365,000 with Sally bringing in approx. $38,000 for down payment and closing.

One thing to consider, beyond more forgiving underwriting, with FHA is that your mortgage will be assumable.  Imagine having a rate of 4.875% a few years from now when rates will most likely be much higher.  If you are a seller competing with other similar home on the market, and you can offer an assumable mortgage at a tempting rate–this will be a serious advantage.   Once inflation happens, mortgage rates will be much higher.

If Seattle Sally’s credit score comes in lower than expected (this is all based on very preliminary information) FHA may become a better option as well.  

*rates quotes are as of 1:30pm on October 8, 2009 and are based on mid credit scores of 740 or higher.  Rates can and do change often.  Follow me on Twitter to see live rate quotes.

For your personal rate quote on a home located anywhere in Washington, click here.

Relocating to Washington State and Getting Preapproved for a Mortgage

When relocating to a new State, many want to have their next home purchased to avoid the inconvenience of having to move twice from temporary housing to their permanent home in Washington.  Lenders want to know that the borrower have employment and the ability to make their mortgage payments.

If you have a job waiting for you at your new location, often times a copy of your employment contract documenting the start date, salary and probability of continued employment.  A verification of employment will be performed either/or verbally or with a VOE (verification of employment) form to be completed by the new employer.  It’s also important to know that the new employment must be in the same line of work as the previous employment.

What if you’re self employed and moving your business out of area?  Unless your clients are able to follow you, such as an internet based business, it may be challenging to use your past income for qualifying as you are leaving your client base behind.

There various types of income may not impacted by relocating (subject to underwriting guidelines), such as:

  • Rental income
  • Retirement/Social Security
  • Alimony or Child Support
  • Notes receivable
  • Interest and dividends
  • Income from Trust

Other types of income may be considered as well…but if you’re planning on qualifying based on income from your “future” job–make sure you’re actually on pay-roll and do discuss your personal scenario with a qualified Mortgage Professional before you make any moves.

The Wild Cards of Refinancing

Jokers In years past, refinancing was a fairly simple task.  Homeowners would contact me wanting to restructure their mortgage to either reduce their monthly payments or perhaps to take equity to improve their home or pay off debts.  Back then, a 680 credit score was considered decent (anything over 720 was great) and people had a good idea of what their homes would appraise for and if they didn’t, I could usually determine a value by obtaining sales comps from a title insurance company.  It’s just not so anymore.  Refinancing can be trickier because there are “wild cards” involved that may not be revealed until you are deeper into the transaction.

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