The REAL Income Needed to Buy Median-Priced Home in Seattle

Seattle income

KOMO News is reporting that it takes an income of $105K to buy a median-priced home in the Seattle area. This is based off a report from HSH.com.  When you dig deeper into the report, here’s how HSH.com came up with their numbers: [Read more…]

Buying a Home Using Your S.O.’s Income

Recently I helped a couple buy a home in King County. They’re engaged, had been living together for many years and were ready to purchase their first home. One of them, Billy Bellevue, had some credit issues and it made more sense for them to only have Susie Seattle’s on the transaction. [Read more…]

Got Bonus? Part 2: Stocks

On Part 1 of Got Bonus, I covered how lump sum cash or increases to salary are treated when it comes to qualifying for a home mortgage loan. In this post, I’ll address how bonuses that are in the form of company stock are treated by lenders. [Read more…]

Got Bonus?

The Seattle Times announced yesterday that Boeing employees will be receiving a record $600 million in bonuses starting next week. From the Seattle Times:

“Boeing’s nearly 66,000 current employees in the state will be eligible for the bonuses. More than 6,000 more who worked at least part of last year before leaving the company will get a partial bonus, prorated according to how long they worked last year.” [Read more…]

How Much Income and Down Payment do You *Really* Need to Buy a Home in Seattle?

The local media is picking up on an article written by HSH.com that could depress Seattle area home buyers regarding how much income is needed to buy a home in various metropolitan cities. The report relies on data provided by NAR and… ready for this… claims that you need to have an income of $73,851.06 in order to buy a home in the Emerald City.

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How much income do you need to buy a home in Seattle?

Young Couple With New HouseAn article (hat tip to Julie Hall) caught my eye in my Facebook stream regarding how much income a household needs in order to be able to buy a home in various metropolitan cities. According to New York Smash, if you’re going to buy a home in Seattle, you’re going to need an annual income of at least $63,145.41.  There’s more to just how much income one makes when it comes to determining “how much” home someone can qualify for. The article does not mention how much down payment a person will need. Let’s run some figures to see just how much income one needs to buy a home in Seattle.

[Read more…]

Quick mortgage tip for self-employed and commissioned paid individuals

Earlier today I was having a conversation with a self-employed woman who just filed her 2011 taxes prior to the October extension deadline. She’s eager to buy a home in the greater Seattle area and her 2012 income shows a continued trend higher. She’s curious as to how quickly she can use her 2012 income for qualifying.

Typically for a self-employed or commissioned paid borrower,lenders want to see the last two years complete tax returns and will basically average the last two years net income assuming their income is steady or improving.

I advised her to file her 2012 taxes as soon as possible if she’s planning on using her 2012 income for qualifying. Not only will the 2012 tax returns need to be filed before a lender can use the income, most lenders will require a the tax returns to also be verified by the IRS.

Lenders use Form 4506 to obtain a tax transcript for several reasons, in addition to verifying taxes have been filed. The tax transcripts are a summary of the tax returns which reveal items such as income and deductions for a specific year. W2 salaried employees may be caught off guard if they claim a lot of work related deductions as an underwriter will most likely deduct those “expenses” from their gross income. Any conflicts between the what has been provided to the lender and what the IRS is reported must be addressed. 

During busier times for the IRS, such as April when income tax is due, it may take several weeks to obtain tax transcripts for that year. Even if the earliest my Seattle home buyer can file is at the beginning of February, she’ll at least have a beat the April rush.

So if you’re planning on buying a home in the beginning of the year and you need your 2012 income to qualify, file your taxes early. Chances are, your lender may not be able to close without being able to obtain your transcripts. 

If you’re considering buying or refinancing your home located in Washington state, I’m happy to help you!

Changing jobs during the mortgage process

Sometimes an employment opportunity may become available while you’re in the process of buying a home or refinancing. Lenders are looking at a borrowers employment and income stability so depending on the type of field you’re in, a change of employment may or may not impact your loan approval. 

As long as you’re staying in the same line of work and if you have an annual salary, it probably won’t be an issue. The lender will probably require at least one pay stub (possibly more to document your income) from your new employer as well as a verification of income. If you have an employment letter or contract from the new employer, this can be helpful to provide the lender as well. With new employment, signing bonuses are not factored into the annual income however, they may be used towards the down payment or closing cost as your seasoned funds. 

If the new employment is not related to the same line of work, this may cause an issue with the loan approval as lenders are looking for two years of employment in the same or related field. If the income structure has changed, this may cause an issue as well unless it is to an annual salary. The underwriter may require a written letter explaining your employment history.

Moving from annual salaried income to a potentially flexible type of income may derail your loan approval. Self-employed, hourly income, bonus or commissioned income requires a two year history before a lender can use it for qualifying purposes.

Sometimes a promotion can impact loan approval if pay structure changes. For example, if a borrower was paid an annual salary and then receives a promotion which reduces the annual salary in exchange for a higher bonus or commission structure, the bonus or commission income cannot be used unless the borrower has been receiving that type of income for a minimum of two years. In this case, the new lower base salary (the “guaranteed” portion of the income) can be used, but not the “flexible” bonus type income. 

If you are considering a job change during the mortgage process, it’s crucial to inform your mortgage originator as soon as possible. Your loan application needs to be updated and the lender will be doing a verification of employment prior to funding your mortgage.  

If you’re considering buying or refinancing a home anywhere in Washington, I’m happy to help you!