New Conforming Loan Limit Won’t Help Refi’s w/2nds…FHA May Save the Day

Share

Fannie Mae’s underwriting guidelines for the temporary conforming loan limits have been released and it looks like the new loan amounts are not going to be as helpful as many had hoped.   The new guidelines for loan amounts between $417,001 – $567,500 in King, Snohomish and Pierce Counties are far more strict.

The biggest whammy is that if you were hoping to combine your first and second mortgage (or heloc) into one new conforming-jumbo mortgage, you’re out of luck.  Fannie is not allowing any "cash out" refinances.  This means that even if you were just paying off the two mortgages and not receiving a nickle back at closing–it’s not going to fly. 

You must have a minimum of 660 credit scores for a fixed rate purchase for a LTV of 80% or less for a purchase using a fixed or adjustable rate.

Limited cash out refinances are allowed up to 75% loan to value with a minimum 660 credit score.  Limited cash-out means that you are allowed to roll in the closing costs to the refinance and receive no more than $2000 cash back at closing (no second mortgages/helocs can be included in the refinance).

Update:  it appears that Freddie Mac will allow cash out refinances up to a 75% loan to value with a 720 minimum credit score.

Adjustable rate mortgages are qualified at the fully amortized PITI at the higher of the note rate or fully indexed rate (worse case rate). 

Be prepared for a "full doc" mortgage.  There is no "stated income" allowed.   You will also need two months of reserves (PITI) and are limited to a 45% DTI (debt to income) ratio.

You can only have four financed properties, including your principal residence.

On Monday, I believe lenders will finally unveil pricing…which again is said to not be as exciting as consumers had hoped.  I’m hearing that the rates will fall between current Jumbo and conforming.   

Rumor has it that the FHA-jumbo will be more friendly to "jumbo" homeowners…if they can get over paying the upfront MIP (1.5% of your loan amount) and monthly mortgage insurance (0.5% of your loan amount/12 months).   For example, on a $500,000 loan amount, the upfront MIP would be $7500 (typically financed into the loan) plus monthly mortgage insurance in the amount of $208.33…even if you have an 80% loan to value.  We’ll just have to wait and see a couple more days.

Remember, these loan limits only last through December 31, 2008.

More to follow. 

Comments

  1. Thanks for this! We’re thinking about refinancing our $600,000 mortgage. Our hope is to put the $567,500 into the first loan and the balance into the second loan. Is this possible under these guidelines?

  2. Kalley,
    It will depend on what your loan to value is. I’m glad you like the article and that I could help.

Speak Your Mind

*