Tis the Season for Vacations

Many families are squeezing in a vacation during the remaining days of summer. I can’t blame them, I’m just back from one myself! If you are in the mortgage process, it’s critical that your let your mortgage originator know of any vacation (or business travel) plans. 

If you’re going to be in a spot where you can receive important documents and respond to emails, it may not be a huge issue. If you’re going off the grid, it may impact your rate lock commitment if your loan is currently locked. Your mortgage originator will need to price out a long enough lock period for your loan (if you’re locking) or you may opt to float and not lock in the current rates available.  And of course, if you run out of time with your lock, the rate lock commitment may be extended

Another factor is signing your final loan documents. Escrow companies can email (I do not recommend sending final docs via email) or send your loan documents via something like FedEx or UPS. This can be a bit risky as well as if a signature is missed or something is not notarized properly, your transaction may be delayed.

The more notice you can provide your mortgage originator about vacation or business travel, the more time they will have to prepare your options for the mortgage process.

Vacations over…I’m back to work!

I’m back to work after my vacation in Hawaii with my son. We had a great time exploring Oahu’s beautiful beaches. The last time I was in Hawaii was probably about 12 years ago when my husband was a county manager for a title insurance company. And we brought home beautiful weather to Seattle – wasn’t this weekend gorgeous?

Okay… back to work. This week we don’t have a lot on deck as far as scheduled economic indicators. 

Wednesday, August 8: Productivity

Thursday, August 9: Initial Jobless Claims

Watch for the results of the bond auctions starting Tuesday and ending Thursday when the Treasury will be selling $72B in notes and bonds.

Last Friday’s Jobs Report came in stronger than expected which has caused mortgage rates to trend higher.  With that said, mortgage rates are still extremely low.

As of 7:40 am this morning (8/6/2012), I’m quoting 3.500% (apr 3.579) for a 30 year fixed rate based on a sales price of $500,000 with a $400,000 loan amount (20% down) and low-mid credit scores of 740 closing in 30 days for a purchase in greater Seattle.

If you’re interested in a mortgage rate quote or getting preapproved for a purchase or refinance for a home located anywhere in Washington state, please contact me.

Taking a Break!

I’m on vacation and will be back to work on Monday, August 5, 2012.  I haven’t been on a vacation with my son since we went to Disneyland. He was around seven … he turns twenty this year! 

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Should you need anything while I’m away, please contact my office at 253-859-5300, or my sister-in-law and President of Mortgage Master Service Corporation, Marilyn Porter, at 206-669-2746.

How to Prepare for the Final Phase of the Mortgage Process: Underwriting

You’ve completed a loan application and have provided your mortgage originator with your income and asset documents. You’re told your loan is being submitted to “underwriting”. During the stage, the information you’ve provided is being scrutinized by a person (the underwriter) to make sure that it meets your specific program guidelines and the investor/lender guidelines. 

Hopefully your mortgage originator has done a solid job with your application by addressing possible questions the underwriter may have and gathering supporting documentation. Even if your mortgage originator and you have prepared the perfect loan ap for the underwriter, additional items are often called for after the underwriters review. These additional items are referred to as “conditions” to the loan approval. 

Here are a few quick tips to help make this process a little smoother.

  • Save everything. If you’re a shredder, like me, it’s time to stop… at least until after your loan has funded. Keep your paystubs, bank statements, retirement and asset accounts – you will probably have to continue to provide updated information to the lender.
  • Be prepared to document where large deposits ($1000 or more) came from on your statements. This means providing deposit slips and/or copies of the cancelled checks.
  • Provide “all pages” of items requested unless otherwise instructed. If an underwriter sees that your bank statement shows 1 to 4 pages, and you’re missing the last page (even if it’s blank), you will be required to provide this. “All pages” also needs to be provided of your tax returns, divorce decrees, child support orders and other documentation if requested by the underwriter. Just providing pages you feel are purtinent may delay your loan approval.
  • Avoid moving funds around. You will need to show where the funds came from and just saying “can’t you see I have gazillions in this account” won’t cut it with the underwriter.
  • Do not apply for credit. This creates an “inquiry” on your credit report. Your credit report is checked prior to closing and, if you have a new inquiry on your credit report, you will have the opportunity of explaining this to the underwriter. If you do obtain new credit, your loan will need to be re-underwritten with the new debt — even if there is no payment due (such as 60 days same as cash, etc.)
  • Provide requested documents promptly
  • If you’re planning a vacation, let your mortgage originator know as soon as possible.

Quickly providing everything that is being requested will help avoid delays with the mortgage process. 

In my opinion, a professional Mortgage Originator will essentially “pre-underwrite”  you as they take your application. They know what questions to ask and what documentation to provide the underwriter.  This is much better than working with a mortgage originator who has little to no experience in closing transactions, which you will probably find at large banks or large internet lenders.

If you’re interested in getting preapproved for a mortgage on a home located anywhere in Washington, I’m happy to help you!